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Discouraged

Last week was a definite high. Things were going great! My observation went well, I was excited for the projects that I was leaving for while I was going to be out, and the substitute teacher that was scheduled to cover for me knew the language *and* the math! It was all looking good!

I arrived back at school to find my plans weren't completely followed. I know this is not unusual, but in preparing I thought I was ready for everything that could happen and that I had thought of everything...organized, etc. I guess not.

My Algebra 1 class that was solving 2-step equations like crazy on Wednesday bombed a quiz that they took on Friday (which they were supposed to take Thursday...but that's another story entirely). I felt like I needed to start from scratch again, and that everything from the week before was lost.

I had no Algebra 1 class today, so no chance to redeem. Tomorrow is a new day, though. We're going to correct the quizzes and then move on. We can't be solving 2-step equations forever, but we need it as a foundation!

Comments

  1. I've been following you on Twitter for a while now (I'm @stewartn), but I haven't read your blog before and I didn't realize what you did. I'm looking forward to following your journey, as I am on journey that is not completely dissimilar.

    You said, "Tomorrow is a new day, though. We're going to correct quizzes and move on." This is one of my favorite things about teaching - there are so many do-overs. If you don't get it right the first time, you can learn from your mistakes and improve next time. Be sure to reflect on what/how you would change your instruction. I find blogging is a great way to to do that.

    ReplyDelete
  2. @Nancy
    Thanks for commenting! I'm new to the blogosphere as a writer, so we'll see how it goes. What is your journey? Do tell!

    ReplyDelete

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